Rosalie Sorrels

Rick Ardinger/Courtesy of Red House Records

Boise-born Rosalie Sorrels made a name for herself on the folk singer circuit of the late 1950s. Her first major gig was at the 1966 Newport Folk Festival and she has been featured on more than 30 albums. Sorrels passed away in 2017 and today, Rosalie's son, Kevin, is crowdsourcing funds to put on The First Rosalie Sorrels Annual Memorial Festival. Kevin Sorrels joins Idaho Matters to talk about his mother's legacy and how she was influenced by Idaho, the state she called home.

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The Idaho Statesman

Idaho music icon Rosalie Sorrels passed away Sunday. Known as the “Travelin’ Lady,” she drove around the country for decades, singing folk music and recording more than 20 albums. But she always came home to Idaho.

I met Rosalie in the early 1990s when a friend asked me to help produce a CD of union folk songs. Until then, I only knew her through her songs broadcast on KBSU radio. Many people knew her through her music, which spilled out of her, night after night, as she toured the country constantly.

Friends and family of Idaho folksinger Rosalie Sorrels are raising money for a tribute album to honor her work as a musician.

“This album will be a tribute to her and her long career in folk music,” says Rick Ardinger, the Director of the Idaho Humanities Council and friend of Sorrels.

Sorrels spent more than six decades keeping folk music alive. Ardinger says he first saw her perform in the 1970s when he was a student at Idaho State University and she played in a coffeehouse.