Salmon

via Lonesome Larry Project

 

This interview originally aired Oct. 1, 2020.

Last winter, we introduced you to a Boise middle school student behind the “Lonesome Larry Project, a project by Topher Jones to save the sockeye salmon. His approach? Selling socks. 

In just one year, Topher has raised more than $12,000 to protect the sockeye and other threatened fish in the western United States.

Nicholas K. Geranios / AP Images

Just weeks after the federal government said it would keep the four lower Snake River dams in place, conservation and sportsmen groups are suing once again.

via Lonesome Larry Project

 


Last winter, we introduced you to a Boise middle school student behind the “Lonesome Larry Project, a project by Topher Jones to save the sockeye salmon. His approach? Selling socks. 

Chinook Salmon
Roger Tabor / USFWS Pacific

In March, Idaho Fish and Game projected the number of Chinook salmon would be well below normal in Idaho’s rivers this spring. Last week, the agency determined the returns of fish making their way from the ocean would be even lower than those predictions.

 

 


This is an encore presentation.

Until a few decades ago, the killer whales of the Puget Sound were frequently captured by the dozen and sold for entertainment at marine parks across the U.S. Today, these incredible creatures are the subject of new protections, and increased scientific inquiry.  But their waters remain under threat. Pollution and marine traffic continue to wraek havoc, and orcas’ ability to thrive is still very much in doubt.

  

Jackie Johnston / AP Images

 


Should the four Lower Snake River dams be torn down? The debate has been going on for decades. 

via Lonesome Larry Project

When Topher Jones was in 5th grade, his class raised sockeye salmon to learn about the endangered species. The lesson inspired the driven student to make a difference and help save the sockeye. Idaho Matters talks with the 11-year-old founder of the Lonesome Larry Project, which sells socks to support research and conservation of the fish. 

Rick Bowmer / AP Images


  Getting hatchery Snake River sockeye salmon from Idaho to the Pacific Ocean and back again is no easy task. A new hatchery that costs $14 million opened in 2013 to add another million fish each year going out of the Gem State. The first fish from the hatchery started coming back to the Sawtooth Valley this year. As of last week, only 15 sockeye had come home. We talk with Idaho Statesman special correspondent Rocky Barker about the factors making the process more challenging.

Roger Phillips / Idaho Fish and Game

Every year at this time, biologists at Idaho Fish and Game watch closely for Snake River sockeye salmon to return to Idaho. This year, Fish and Game expects fewer fish to return to Redfish Lake. That’s due in part to the tough year the young fish had in 2017, trying to get out of Idaho to the Pacific Ocean. Now two years later, they still have to swim back over several dams to get to Idaho.

Roger Tabor / USFWS

Idaho and Oregon have worked out a deal to keep operating the Hells Canyon Complex on the Snake River.

 

John Lillis / Flickr Creative Commons

If you’re preparing to go on a float trip down the Middle Fork of the Salmon River, beware: The river’s namesake will be spawning below the surface for the next four weeks.

Charles Anderson / Flickr Creative Commons

Earlier this week, the U.S House of Representatives passed passed a bill allowing permit holders to kill sea lions along the Columbia and Willamette Rivers in an effort to protect threatened fish populations.

 

Bryan Wright / Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Republican Sen. Jim Risch is sponsoring a bill that would make it easier for federal fishery managers to kill sea lions that could prey on salmon and steelhead. Democratic Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington has also signed on in support of the proposal.

 


Nicholas K. Geranios / AP Images

A decades-long debate over four Snake River dams and salmon resurfaced on the floor of the U.S. House Wednesday. A bill from Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Washington) would prohibit removal or other structural changes of dams on the Federal Columbia River Power System.

Aaron Kunz / EarthFix

Idaho officials have reached a tentative agreement approving a utility company's $216.5 million in relicensing expenses for a three-dam hydroelectric project on the Snake River on the Idaho-Oregon border.

Rocky Barker

Removing the four lower Snake River dams could be enough to bring salmon stocks back from the brink of extinction. That’s one conclusion from reporter Rocky Barker’s series on the fish in the Idaho Statesman, which wrapped up this month.

Sara Simmonds / Idaho Fish and Game

The first two sockeye salmon to make it home from the Pacific Ocean in 2017 have arrived in the Stanley Basin. It’s a rough year for the fish.

Jackie Johnston / AP Images

A debate about four Washington state dams has put the spotlight back on a longstanding story about salmon. The Idaho Statesman has begun a series about the endangered species, which asks whether destroying the dams will be enough to save the fish. Frankie Barnhill sat down with Statesman reporter Rocky Barker to learn more about what’s at stake.
 

Ken Cole / Western Watersheds Project

An environmental group and the U.S. Forest Service have agreed to a deal to help fish in the Salmon River.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife / Associated Press

Organizers of a wolf- and coyote-shooting contest in east-central Idaho say they're looking at other parts of the state for similar contests on U.S. Forest Service land following a federal court ruling.

"Having this lawsuit out of the way and having this legal precedent, we will probably consider it a lot greater now," Steve Alder, Idaho for Wildlife's executive director, said Tuesday.

U.S. District Court Judge Ronald Bush in a 20-page ruling late last month said Idaho for Wildlife didn't need a permit from the U.S. Forest Service to hold the contest.

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