Students Come First

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

Idaho voters delivered a resounding defeat to three new education laws. Voters said no to limits on teacher bargaining rights, to creating a pay-for-performance system and to ramping up classroom technology.  Opponents were successful, in part, by billing the laws as an attack on teachers. 

When the first results came in, the Vote No campaign brought out the bagpipes.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

All three of public schools chief Tom Luna's education overhaul initiatives were failing just before

midnight Tuesday.

About 40 percent of the precincts statewide were counted.

But if the numbers hold, it would be a clear disaster for Luna's plans to remake Idaho's schools.

By far, Luna's plan to spend $180 million on student laptops over eight years and require online courses to graduate was faring the worst, securing just a third of the vote.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Voters around Idaho are heading to the polls this afternoon.

In the state's largest county voting has been smooth so far.  That’s according to Phil McGrane, Ada County’s Chief Deputy Clerk. ”Only small issues far, we haven’t had any real challenges to deal with and as far as we know right now there aren’t any strong lines to speak of and people are able to get in and get out relatively quickly.”

yaquina / Flickr Creative Commons

Americans head to the polls Tuesday. Here in Idaho big turnout is expected. Many Idahoans have already voted including 1,700 high school students. They took part in the state's student mock election.  

idahokidscount.org

Tuesday Idahoan’s will vote on propositions 1, 2, and 3. Those ask if the state should keep the controversial education laws known as Students Come First. The laws limit collective bargaining rights and seek to increase technology use in schools. One of the laws also creates a pay for performance plan where teachers can earn bonuses. Now that law has drawn criticism from an unexpected source.

twitter.com/@IdahoGOP

Idaho’s Republican Party is not pleased with a group known as Idaho Republicans for Our Schools. It’s a political committee created to campaign for no votes on ballot Propositions 1, 2, and 3. Those ask voters if they want to keep the state’s Students Come First education laws which restrict collective bargaining for teachers, institute a pay for performance system and increase technology use in schools.

Pro-Proposition 1, 2, 3 Group Must Reveal Donors

Oct 29, 2012
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

A judge has ordered a group campaigning for Idaho’s Propositions 1, 2 and 3 to reveal its donors. But  that doesn’t mean the list of names will be public any time soon.

JenCarole / Flickr Creative Commons

If you had hoped to find out this week who donated money to an organization campaigning for Idaho’s Propositions 1, 2, and 3: you’re out of luck. An Idaho district judge had been scheduled to hear arguments from Idaho’s Secretary of State and Education Voters of Idaho today. Ed Voters want people to keep the state’s Students Come First education laws which are up for voter repeal. But the group doesn’t want to say where it got its funding.

Anthony Johnstone
University of Montana

Idaho’s Secretary of State wants a court to order a group campaigning for Idaho’s ballot referenda to reveal its donors.

toddwendy / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho’s Secretary of State has asked a judge to order an organization that is campaigning for Propositions 1, 2, and 3 to reveal its donors. Ben Ysursa went to Idaho’s Fouth District Court Monday seeking the order against Education Voters of Idaho.

Boise School District

The Boise School District has a beef with the Idaho School Boards Association.  At issue is the ISBA’s endorsement of Proposition 1 on Idaho’s November ballot. Prop 1 asks voters if they want to keep the law that restricts collective bargaining for teachers and eliminates long term contracts. Boise School Board president A. J. Balukoff says the ISBA president said in August the organization was split on the ballot referenda and would not take a position.

Ben Ysursa
Courtesy of Idaho Secretary of State's office

Friday is the deadline Idaho’s Secretary of State has given a nonprofit to reveal its donors. The group Education Voters of Idaho gave more than $200,000 to a second group to campaign for Idaho’s Students Come First education laws. Voters will decide if they want to repeal those through Propositions 1, 2, and 3 on the November ballot.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

KBSX has been keeping close tabs on the media fight over Idaho’s propositions 1, 2, and 3. We told you Monday morning the campaign that wants voters to keep the state’s Students Come First education laws had launched a new ad that used an out of context quote.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho voters go to the polls in three weeks to select a president, congressional candidates and state legislators. They’ll also vote on whether to keep the state’s sweeping education overhaul known as Students Come First.

“I think this issue dwarfs everything else on the ballot. And this is one of very few in which the outcome is in doubt,” says James Weatherby, Boise State professor emeritus of political science. Monday Weatherby moderated a forum on Propositions 1, 2, and 3.

Polls Show Idaho Voters Leaning Against Education Laws

Oct 15, 2012
pheezy / Flickr Creative Commons

Two new polls show Idaho voters leaning against the state’s Students Come First education laws. The Idaho Statesman and the Vote No On Props 1, 2 and 3 campaign each hired large polling firms to measure opinions on the three ballot referenda. Both show more people planning to vote no than yes. Ken Burgess runs the Vote Yes campaign and wants voters to keep the laws.

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