Trash

Flickr Creative Commons

As most of us have been spending more time at home, the amount of waste we’ve been taking to the curb has increased, too.  Trucks picking up our trash, recycling and compostable materials have been arriving in some neighborhoods an hour earlier than residents might be used to.

 

Don't Dump That Old Couch In A Canal

Aug 14, 2019
Pioneer Irrigation District

TVs, tires, mattresses, even a recliner — all these items, and lots and lots of trash, are dumped into canals and ditches around the Treasure Valley. Sometimes it’s grass clippings or tree limbs that are dumped, which can clog the water flow. The Treasure Valley Water Users Association says it’s a growing problem.

Erin McClure / Boise State Public Radio

In 2014, an analysis in Ada County determined that nearly half of the trash being thrown out by residential households was organic waste, such as food scraps, yard debris, and compostable paper. Now, in an effort to reduce the amount of trash going to the landfill, the City of Boise has announced plans for a public composting program.

Boise city staff presented the first details of the composting program proposal at last Tuesday’s City Council meeting. City spokesman Mike Journee says it’s been dubbed ‘Curb It 2’ and will be an extension of Curb It, the city’s recycling system.

Boise National Forest

The Boise National Forest is reporting an increase of trash and human waste being left behind at campsites.

All ranger districts are reporting more trash, but the Lowman Ranger District has been hit especially hard along Highway 21 and in the Deadwood Reservoir areas.

Fire pits have been loaded with trash. Fecal material has been found near the camps. Toilet paper has been left behind. That’s according to John Kidd, Lowman District Ranger.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

Now that presents have been opened, it's time for another tradition of the holiday season: bags upon bags of trash.  One garbage collector in north Idaho says he sees reflections of the economy in this year’s haul.

At the transfer station in Shoshone County, Idaho, signs of the holidays are all around Vince Peterson.

“Mostly the amount of cardboard, plastic," he says.  "Wrapping paper goes wild.”