Twin Falls

Screenshot from video by Jason Urry / St. Lukes

Last month we told you the story of a Twin Falls doctor, who was once paralyzed, but was able to climb Idaho's tallest mountain. Now you can watch a video of his inspiring climb.

Jonathon Myers broke his neck ten years ago in a car accident. Paralyzed from the neck down, he fought back and learned how to walk again. He went to medical school and specialized in rehabilitation.

Courtesy Twin Falls County Fair Board

So, Jesse Owens came to Twin Falls for a race in 1938 … against a horse. Yes, the Jesse Owens you learned about in history class who humiliated Hitler by dominating the 1936 Berlin Olympics. According to the Twin Falls Times-News Hidden History column, Owens was at the Southern Idaho Fair (now the Twin Falls County Fair) for a simple reason: money.

Clif Bar Opens New Idaho Plant

Aug 30, 2016
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The city of Twin Falls and Clif Bar Tuesday celebrate the opening of a new plant that will bake all flavors of the company’s signature energy bars and a line of kid’s bars. The plant is nearly 300,000 square feet and employs more than 200 people with about 60 more to be added early next year. The lowest wage is $15 an hour.

Leaflet / Wikimedia Commons

A hospital trying to raise money for a high-tech piece of equipment to help its patients might be newsworthy. Someone who was once paralyzed and is now climbing Idaho’s tallest mountain certainly would be. Now a Twin Falls doctor who thought he’d never walk again is climbing Borah Peak Wednesday in order to raise money for a machine to help his patients learn to walk again.

92 Keys / Instagram

It may be difficult to find a more quintessentially #Idaho backdrop for a music video than Shoshone Falls.  

A prosecutor in south-central Idaho is refuting a widespread rumor that three young Syrian refugees raped a girl at knifepoint.

Twin Falls County Prosecutor Grant Loebs says that no gang rape involving Syrian refugees or a knife took place despite allegations currently circulating on social media and conspiracy-oriented websites.

The national YMCA has put its Twin Falls chapter on probation after finding widespread financial mismanagement at that branch.

The Times-News reports that a February assessment conducted by the national YMCA says the nonprofit organization's local board asked for help when it realized then-CEO Gary Ettenger was providing false financial information.

Ettenger stepped down in March. He could not be reached for comment.

A federal official who helps oversee refugee resettlement in the U.S. says despite an effort to do away with a program in Twin Falls, he still thinks the city is a viable option for refugees.

Authorities say a south-central Idaho man responding to a Craigslist ad offering a car for sale shot and killed one man and wounded another with an assault weapon before stealing the car.

Police say 20-year-old Jacob Lyn Marshall of Jackson was arrested Saturday evening hours after the shooting when he rammed a police car with the stolen 1991 Mitsubishi 3000 VR4.

Police also arrested 22-year-old Jerry Burton Kimball, who authorities say accompanied Marshall.

Utility, Inc. / Flickr

Officers with the Twin Falls Police Department will soon begin wearing body cameras.

The Times-News reports that city officials approved applying for a federal grant on Monday to help cover the cost of buying 55 body cameras.

Police Capt. Anthony Barnhart says uniformed officers and narcotics detectives will wear cameras either attached to their uniforms or glasses.

All officers will continue wearing audio recording devices.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr

An Idaho event scheduled as an alternative to West Virginia's Bridge Day is in jeopardy.

The Charleston Gazette reports some residents of Twin Falls, Idaho, have asked BASE jumpers to cancel the Idaho event after a series of BASE jumping accidents there and elsewhere last month left three people dead.

TwinFallsChamber.com

Twin Falls has become a Mecca for BASE jumpers -  people who parachute off bridges, buildings and cliffs. The city's Perrine Bridge is one of few places where people can jump any time without paying or getting a permit. 

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr

BASE jumpers just want to be free. This extreme form of skydiving stands for what people leap from: Buildings and antenna, spans such as bridges, and Earth, which usually means stunningly high cliffs.

In the United States, not very many places allow it. One go-to hub is Twin Falls, Idaho, where a bridge over the Snake River offers unfettered, year-round access. But the sport is under scrutiny after 73-year-old James E. Hickey died. He set his parachute on fire in a stunt this month, and his other chute didn't deploy.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr

Authorities say a 73-year-old BASE jumper who died after leaping from a southern Idaho bridge had set his parachute on fire as part of a stunt.

A graphic video of the May 7 fatal jump was posted on YouTube on Monday. It appears to show James E. Hickey of Claremont, California, engulfed in flames as he plunged 500 feet from the Perrine Bridge to his death in the Snake River.

Rick Strack / Boise State Public Radio

A slow-moving weather system in south-central Idaho that the National Weather Service is calling a 100-year storm dumped nearly 3 inches of rain on Twin Falls and caused widespread flooding.

Twin Falls City Manager Travis Rothweiler tells The Times-News that the city's drainage system on Wednesday became overwhelmed, causing flooded streets, homes and businesses.

Rothweiler says sewage backed up into seven homes in the city, and that state and federal agencies have been notified.

Nikos Koutoulas / Flickr

Firefighters say nearly $100,000 of alfalfa went up in flames Thursday after a large stack spontaneously combusted in Twin Falls.

Rock Creek Fire District spokesman Taylor Hunsaker says the stack, which was made of 480 tons of hay, will burn for almost a week.

Craig Giles, who grew the alfalfa, says he hired a custom operator to bale it. He says the bales were stacked with enough distance between them to allow moisture and heat to escape.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is evaluating proposed sites for a national veterans cemetery in south-central Idaho.

Idaho has a State Veterans Cemetery in Boise and there are a few privately operated veterans cemeteries, but no national veterans cemeteries in Idaho.

Two years ago, the VA announced a plan to build National Veterans Burial Grounds in rural areas. Scouts were in the Twin Falls area last November looking for potential site. Magic Valley Honor Guard leader Wayne Goetz says they were looking for 3 to 5 acres of land.

Two former Twin Falls County sheriff's deputies have filed a lawsuit against the county, contending Sheriff Tom Carter discriminated against them based on their sex.

The Times-News of Twin Falls reported Tuesday the lawsuit was filed March 13 in federal court by Becky White and Susan Stringer.

They contend they were passed over for promotions, given fewer training opportunities than males and held to a higher standard than male deputies.

Two teams want to re-enact Evel Knievel's famous jump over the Snake River Canyon in Idaho.

Snake River Canyon Jump Back In The Spotlight

Feb 10, 2014
City of Twin Falls

The Twin Falls City Council will meet tonight and revisit the issue of planning a jump over the Snake River Canyon. It's the first meeting for the group since council members last week voted to deny access to city-owned land to a Texas stunt-man the city has been negotiating with for months. The council had concerns over Ed Beckley's proposed safety plan. 

BigEdBeckley.net

The Twin Falls City Council has denied a Texas motorcycle stuntman's request to lease the site from which Evel Knievel made his failed attempt to jump the Snake River Canyon in 1974.

A motion to approve the lease to Beckley Media failed on a 5-2 vote on Monday.

Many council members said they were concerned that "Big Ed" Beckley's safety plan for the proposed September jump was incomplete while some questioned whether local law enforcement could handle the expected crowds.

Beth Pendergrass / Twin Falls School District

The Twin Falls School District is asking voters for $73.8 million in the form of a 25 year bond. The district says it needs the money because their elementary schools are overcrowded and their middle and high schools soon will be.

tilapia
MHaze / Flickr Creative Commons

A Twin Falls fish and frog farm has agreed to pay a $25,000 fine as part to settle a case over illegal discharging of phosphorus into the Snake River.

The Environmental Protection Agency announced the settlement Tuesday with McCollum Enterprises, Limited Partnership, which operates the Canyon Springs Fish Farm.

Regulators accused the company of more than 550 violations of its discharge permit between June 2008 and March 2012.

A passel of daredevils aim to succeed where the king of stunt performers once famously failed. They want to attempt Evel Knievel's jump over the Snake River Canyon.

Frank Kovalchek / Flickr Creative Commons

Six groups wanting to get Twin Falls' blessing to jump over the Snake River canyon next year will make their pitch today to the city council.

A total of seven groups have responded to the city's request for proposals. That includes ABC News, as well as "Big" Ed Beckley, the Texas stuntman who's already paid the state of Idaho $1 million for the rights to land on state owned property.

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