Wolves

Critics of wolf reintroduction in the Mountain West say the canine is the biggest threat to elk, but a new study says that’s not necessarily true.

Courtesy Colorado Parks and Wildlife

A gray wolf was spotted in Northern Colorado this week and Wyoming Game and Fish just confirmed it's a member of a Wyoming pack.

 

Roger Phillips / Idaho Fish and Game

Moose are on the decline in Idaho and across the West. That means moose tags for Gem State hunters will be in short supply.

Courtesy Rusty Kramer

If you kill a wolf in Idaho, your effort might be worth $1,000. 

A nonprofit in North Idaho covers costs for hunters and trappers who successfully harvest wolves. The group, called the Foundation for Wildlife Management pays up to $1,000 per wolf harvest.

 

gray wolf, wolves
U.S. Fish & Wildlife

Idaho Fish and Game has killed wolves in the upper part of Idaho. The Department says the goal is to boost the number of elk in the area.

 

Acting Secretary of Interior David Bernhardt said Wednesday that his agency wants to remove the gray wolf from the Endangered Species List. 

gray wolf, wolves
U.S. Fish & Wildlife

Earlier this month, Fish and Game opened up a public comment period for proposed changes to 2019 and 2020 big game hunting. One of the animals that could be affected by the changes are wolves. The new regulations would expand wolf trapping on private land and the season would start a month sooner.

 

The return of wolves and cougars to Yellowstone National Park is helping stream systems make a comeback. The new study published in the journal Ecohydrology suggests returning carnivores to a landscape can have a cascading effect across the ecosystem.

idfg.idaho.gov

The USDA's Wildlife Service distributes funds to ranchers in the West for wolf depredation - the killing off of predators of commercial livestock. Questions have been raised about the number of predatory wolves preying on cattle and how those funds are being divvied out. 

On The Wednesday, August 29, 2018 Edition Of Idaho Matters

Aug 28, 2018

  • Questions surround wolf depredation data in Idaho.
  • St. Luke's Virtual Care Center connects rural and immobile Idahoans with healthcare providers.
  • Boise Weekly film critic George Prentice previews the 2018 Toronto International  Film Festival.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Three wolves have been killed by federal authorities in central Idaho near Stanley, an action blasted by an environmental group.

gray wolf, wolves
U.S. Fish & Wildlife

It’s common for western states to lethally control wolves when they eat livestock, but Idaho is the only state that’s actively killing the carnivores for wildlife management.

Idaho officials don't have to destroy information right away that came from tracking collars placed on wolves and elk by a helicopter crew that landed illegally in a wilderness area where engines are prohibited.

A pack of seven wolves has been found in the Boise Foothills.

Idaho officials are challenging a federal court order to destroy information collected from tracking collars placed on elk and wolves obtained illegally by landing a helicopter in a central Idaho wilderness area.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

USDA Wildlife Services in Idaho is asking ranchers to report all cattle deaths and leave the carcasses undisturbed in an effort to preserve evidence and help investigators confirm a wolf depredation.

Jim Peaco | Yellowstone National Park / Flickr Creative Commons

Wolf hunting opens up this weekend in Wyoming for the first time since 2013. That’s after the state regained management of the animals.


Cathleen Allison / AP Photo

Congressional Republicans are moving forward with legislation to roll back the Endangered Species Act, amid complaints that the landmark 44-year-old law hinders drilling, logging and other activities.

At simultaneous hearings Wednesday, House and Senate committees considered bills to revise the law and limit lengthy and costly litigation associated with it.

Gary Kramer / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Gray wolves killed a record number of livestock in Wyoming last year, and wildlife managers responded by killing a record number of wolves that were responsible, according to a new federal report.

The report released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found that wolves killed 243 livestock, including 154 cattle, 88 sheep and one horse, in 2016. In 2015, 134 livestock deaths attributed to wolves were recorded.

Last year's livestock losses in Wyoming exceeded the previous record of 222 in 2009.

gray wolf, wolves
U.S. Fish & Wildlife

Idaho Fish and Game is thinking about changing the rules for some kinds of hunting in the Gem State.

In what's known as a "negotiated rule making process," Fish and Game is giving the public a chance to weigh in on the six proposed changes.

One change would allow hunters to use bait when hunting wolves. If the rule is implemented, specific times and uses of bait would be outlined.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife / Associated Press

Oregon’s Fish and Wildlife Department is holding a second hearing on a wolf plan Friday in Portland. The plan is unpopular with ranchers and wolf supporters alike.

Oregon didn’t have documented wolves before 2005. Since then, thanks to the animals crossing over the border from Idaho, Oregon now has 11 packs, totaling at least 112 wolves. Twelve years ago, the state adopted a plan to manage the wolves but wants to revise it now that the population is growing.

Neal Herbert / Yellowstone National Park via AP

Yellowstone National Park officials say a wolf they euthanized after hikers found the animal suffering from a serious injury had been shot.

Park officials released preliminary necropsy findings Thursday for the wolf that was discovered wounded on April 11 near Gardiner, Montana, in northern Yellowstone.

They are offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to the shooter's conviction. The alpha female of the Canyon Pack was one of three white wolves in Yellowstone.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife / Associated Press

Organizers of a wolf- and coyote-shooting contest in east-central Idaho say they're looking at other parts of the state for similar contests on U.S. Forest Service land following a federal court ruling.

"Having this lawsuit out of the way and having this legal precedent, we will probably consider it a lot greater now," Steve Alder, Idaho for Wildlife's executive director, said Tuesday.

U.S. District Court Judge Ronald Bush in a 20-page ruling late last month said Idaho for Wildlife didn't need a permit from the U.S. Forest Service to hold the contest.

In a story Feb. 23 about a lawsuit involving a wolf- and coyote-shooting contest in Idaho, The Associated Press reported erroneously the disposition of the suit. The judge dismissed part of the lawsuit, not the entire lawsuit, and a decision on an action the groups have against the U.S. Forest Service involving Idaho for Wildlife's predator contest is pending.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks

A wolf that escaped from a drive-thru wildlife tourist attraction in southeastern Idaho has been shot and killed by the owner of the business, Idaho officials said.

Courtney Ferguson, the owner of Yellowstone Bear World near Yellowstone National Park, tracked the wolf through snow and shot it about an hour after it escaped from the facility that also has bears, elk, bison and deer.

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