What You Should Know About Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter

C.L. “Butch” Otter has been a fixture of Idaho politics since 1973 when he was elected to his first term in the state House of Representatives.

Otter was elected to his third-consecutive term as governor on Nov. 4, 2014. He was elected to his second term as Idaho governor on Nov. 2, 2010. Otter first became Idaho's governor on Nov. 7, 2006.

Gov. Otter was at the helm during the peak of the Great Recession and it was his administration that oversaw the cutting of the state budget, record unemployment, and a boom in the number of people using government assistance.

Otter spoke with StateImpact Idaho back in 2012 about that recession and its lasting impact on Idaho's workforce.

A Brief Biography

Otter, a Republican, is the longest serving lieutenant governor of Idaho, his tenure spanned from 1987-2000. In 2000 he was then elected to the United States Congress and served until 2006.

According to the Washington Post, Otter voted with his party most of the time, 86 percent, but has been known to have an independent streak on some issues.

“He was among three Republicans in the House to vote against the USA Patriot Act in 2001 and he later sponsored a bill to repeal parts of it. But independent streaks are sometimes tolerated in a state that would rather not be told what to do by the federal government.”  - William Yardley, New York Times

Otter was born on May 3, 1942 in Caldwell, Idaho. He attended St. Teresa’s Academy in Boise and graduated from Boise Junior College (now Boise State University) with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science in 1967.

After college, Otter joined the Idaho National Guard and served in the 116th Armored Calvary until 1973.

Butch Otter is married to his second wife, Lori. He has four children and several grandchildren.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

This segment originally aired on May 17, 2019

The National Institute for Civil Discourse was established in 2011 following the shooting in Tucson that killed six and injured 13, including former U.S. Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords. Today, the Institute is creating 50 advisory boards to be positioned in each state.

Idaho is the first state to establish such a board and on we speak with Keith Allred, executive director of the Institute and advisory board members Walt Minnick and former Governor Butch Otter.

  • Idaho Republicans and Democrats come together to form National Institute For Civil Discourse
  • It's a brand new (fiscal) year! What new laws in Idaho take effect this month?
  • The Boise Boys Are HGTV's 'Odd Couple Of Renovation'

Idaho Statesman/DARIN OSWALD

The National Institute for Civil Discourse was established in 2011 following the shooting in Tucson that killed six and injured 13, including former U.S. Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords. Today, the Institute is creating 50 advisory boards to be positioned in each state.

On The Friday, May 17, 2019 Edition Of Idaho Matters

May 16, 2019

  • Our syndicate of reporters breaks down the week's headlines.
  • Idaho hosts the first state advisory board for the National Institute for Civil Discourse.

idahogovernorscup.org

One of former Governor Butch Otter's legacies is the Governor's Cup, an annual tournament that includes golf and skeet shooting. It was established to raise funds for scholarships, but questions are being asked about the cost of the tournament and whether it serves as anything more than a political networking event. The Cup has provided educational funds for some 250 Idahoans, but at what cost?

Gemma Gaudette sits down with Betsy Russell from the Idaho Press, Bill Manny with Idaho Public Television and Kevin Richert with Idaho Education News to discuss the big news of the day: Governor Otter leaving office, Governor-Elect Little taking office and why Idaho's tax revenues are falling short by millions of dollars.

Butch Otter
Idaho Statesman

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is departing the Trump Administration at the end of the year. He’s one of a handful of cabinet-level officials that’s been with the administration from the start. With Zinke’s departure, a list of possible replacements is floating around, and a pair of Idaho politicians are finalists.


AP Photo/Otto Kitsinger

Idaho Governor Butch Otter has endorsed a ballot initiative to expand Medicaid eligibility less than a week before voters head to the polls.

"Proposition 2 is an Idaho-grown solution," Otter says in a new ad released by Idahoans for Healthcare, a group pushing for Medicaid expansion. "Vote yes on Proposition 2. It’s the right thing for Idaho."

Jack Zalium / Flickr Creative Commons

A member of the Idaho Fish and Game Commission resigned after a photo of him posing with hunting trophies on a trip to Africa drew international criticism.


Mike Ensor / Flickr

The infrastructure project to widen part of Interstate 84 through Canyon County received a major federal grant from the Department of Transportation.

cscottgrowforidaho.com

Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter has appointed a small business owner from Eagle to take over a state senate seat.

Idaho State Legislature

Republican state Sen. Marv Hagedorn started his public service in the Navy. Now, he’ll help others who have served in the military in his new role as administrator of the Idaho Division of Veterans Services. The Meridian lawmaker will start his new job at the end of July.

Sadie Babits / Boise State Public Radio

The Idaho Supreme Court has agreed to postpone hearing a case that could change how water rights get divvied up in the Treasure Valley.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Legislative leaders say Gov. Butch Otter might call a special legislative session to address a years-long water battle that has been building in southwestern Idaho.

C-SPAN

Governor Butch Otter was the featured guest on C-SPAN’s program "Washington Journal" Monday morning. The network’s bus rolled into Idaho on a national tour of state capitals.

James Dawson

After 12 years as governor, Butch Otter still says the hardest decisions he’s ever had to make have been whether or not to follow through with the death penalty.

Idaho Education News

Citing a need to maintain high levels of accountability, Gov. Butch Otter vetoed an education bill Monday as the 2018 legislative session draws to a close.

And, once again, Idaho’s K-3, statewide reading test found itself at the center of a political debate.

AP

An Idaho health care proposal to provide insurance to the needy that was deemed dead for the year by legislative leaders has been given a second chance at life.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr

Despite a handful competing tax bills, Gov. Butch Otter will get his $200 million tax cut proposal after all following a two-hour debate by Idaho senators.

 

U.S. Pacific Fleet / Flickr

Governor Butch Otter met with federal health officials over the weekend regarding the future of Idaho’s controversial insurance plans.

Pages