Amanda Peacher

Reporter, Mountain West News Bureau

Amanda Peacher works for the Mountain West News Bureau out of Boise State Public Radio. She's an Idaho native who returned home after a decade of living and reporting in Oregon. She's an award-winning reporter with a background in community engagement and investigative journalism.

Amanda pedals her bike to work and spends weekends hiking the Boise foothills with her toddler and husband, baking unhealthy sweets, or feebly trying to get her garden to grow.

You can reach Amanda at amandapeacher@boisestate.edu.

Amelia Templeton / OPB

This week President Trump pardoned two Oregon ranchers serving five-year prison terms for arson on federal lands. The two men had become a cause celebre in the ongoing fight between ranchers and the federal government over water and grazing rights.

 


Cows
Mouldfish / Flickr

A house subcommittee is focusing on grazing on public lands on Thursday. Republican leaders want to discuss what they call the regulatory burdens on the industry.


Jim Peaco / Yellowstone National Park | Flickr Creative Commons

Bipartisan legislation before the Senate would finally designate congressional funds to take care of about $12 billion of deferred maintenance for national parks. 

 

James Dawson / Boise State Public Radio

Grieving Boiseans and members of the refugee community gathered Monday night to pray, hold vigil and deliver white flowers for the victims of Saturday’s mass stabbing.

 

Ada County Sheriff's Office

The suspect accused of murdering a three-year-old and brutally injuring eight other refugees in a knife attack Saturday night in Boise has a checkered, long history of violence and criminal activity including convictions for felony assault, drug dealing and felony theft.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

The Senate and House have passed two versions of the Farm Bill. The differences between the two pieces of legislation now have to be hashed out by legislators. The final bill could have a big impact on low-income residents in our region.

Jim Peaco / Yellowstone National Park | Flickr Creative Commons

A year and a half into the Trump presidency and several federal land agencies do not have directors—
including the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Former land managers say the lack of leadership has grave consequences for the future of public lands.

 

Amanda Peacher / Mountain West New Bureau

Every day, about 19 people move to Boise. And that growth is creating a housing crunch in the valley.

Amanda Peacher / Mountain West New Bureau

Every day, about 19 people move to Boise. And that growth is creating a housing crunch in the valley.

 

Beth Pendergrass / Twin Falls School District

Each year the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention asks high schoolers about their risky behavior - anything from drug use to bringing weapons to school. For at least one behavior our region’s youth has a high score.

 

courtesy Ed Cannady / www.edcannadyphotography.com

When is the last time you’ve had a clear view of the Milky Way? Chances are you’re among the 99 percent of Americans who can’t see all that much of the night sky from where you live.

 


In another shuffle of department leadership, the Bureau of Land Management has a new Deputy Director of Operations. The agency, along with the National Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, still await Senate-confirmed directors. 

USFWS Mountain-Prairie / Flickr Creative Commons

Public lands facilities around the nation are cutting budgets and staff. But in the Mountain West region, cutbacks at Montana's National Bison Refuge are prompting accusations of a political vendetta by regional U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service managers. 

Amanda Peacher / Mountain West News Bureau

Environmental Protection Agency leader Scott Pruitt made a quiet visit to Boise Tuesday, to sign a new agreement between his agency and the state of Idaho.

 

Courtesy U.S. Forest Service

President Trump has overturned a rule requiring outfitters to pay river and backcountry guides on public lands a minimum wage.

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