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What We Talk About When We Talk About Judges

Judge Bruce Schroeder speaks to the attorneys about how the jury will view evidence as they deliberate during Kyle Rittenhouse's trial at the Kenosha County Courthouse.
Judge Bruce Schroeder speaks to the attorneys about how the jury will view evidence as they deliberate during Kyle Rittenhouse's trial at the Kenosha County Courthouse.

Kyle Rittenhouse has been acquitted of all charges in a criminal trial that’s underscored deep divides over gun rights, vigilantism, and racial justice protests.

And throughout the trial, Judge Bruce Schroeder has garnered a lot of attention.

From NPR‘s coverage of the case:

As Rittenhouse’s trial has unfolded in the weeks since, Schroeder has alternately drawn cheers and criticism among legal experts and other observers of the trial. While some of his actions were inconsequential, others — including a strong admonishment of the lead prosecutor last week — could be pivotal to the trial’s outcome.

“I think what people are surprised by is some of these … little quirks, maybe, that they’re not used to seeing in judges. There are all sorts of personalities that are on the bench, all across the country,” said Julius Kim, a defense attorney and former prosecutor based in Milwaukee who has appeared before Schroeder.

The trial has raised tough questions about judges — who gets to be one, how they’re assigned cases, how they’re appointed, and how they’re removed.

A former judge and legal expert answer your questions. Plus, an update on the Rittenhouse trial.

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