© 2024 Boise State Public Radio
NPR in Idaho
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

California condors return to ancestral skies

A rare and endangered California condor flies through Marble Gorge, east of Grand Canyon National Park March 22, 2007 west of Page, Arizona. (David McNew/Getty Images)
A rare and endangered California condor flies through Marble Gorge, east of Grand Canyon National Park March 22, 2007 west of Page, Arizona. (David McNew/Getty Images)

Imagine California condors soaring for miles and miles without even using that majestic nine-foot wingspan. Sadly, Native American tribes have had to imagine the very existence of condors for a long time — since the birds were wiped out from their ancestral territory by the early 20th century.

But this spring, the condors will soar again when they’re reintroduced by the Yurok Tribe of Northern California. Host Celeste Headlee speaks with Tiana Williams-Claussen, director of the Yurok Tribe’s Wildlife Department.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

You make stories like this possible.

The biggest portion of Boise State Public Radio's funding comes from readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

Your donation today helps make our local reporting free for our entire community.