© 2021 Boise State Public Radio

For assistance accessing our public files, please contact us at boisestatepublicradio@boisestate.edu or call (208) 426-3663.
WebHeader_3.png
NPR in Idaho
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
What is the single most important question about COVID-19 you think needs to be answered? Submit it for a special Idaho Matters Doctors Roundtable in English and Spanish.
Economy
Idaho dairy farmers produce more milk and cheese than almost any state in the nation. Idaho is ranked third behind California and Wisconsin.

Idaho Wineries Happy To See Grape Harvest Going Well

wine, grapes, agriculture, harvest
Laura Gilmore
/
Flickr Creative Commons

 

After a long and heavy winter wrecked much of southwest Idaho’s 2017 grape harvest, local vineyards and wineries alike are excited to see that this year’s harvest is on the upswing.

According to the Capital Press, recovering and re-training vineyards last year really paid off for this harvest. Re-training is the process of cutting damaged vines away and helping new vines up onto the wire.

Earl Sullivan, owner and head winemaker of Telaya Wine Co., points out how re-training can raise a bit of a problem:

“The new growth has to come up and be put on the fruiting wire. That takes as much effort and manpower as if they were having a harvest because they have to go back and retrain everything, so you know, it’s essentially a new vine.”

But all that work paid off. With the typical grape harvest starting at the beginning of September and finishing up in mid-October, Idaho wineries are starting to see their fruit roll in. Their barrels may not be overflowing, as the vines are still recovering, but the crop is a lot healthier than last year.

For more local news, follow the KBSX newsroom on Twitter @KBSX915

Copyright 2018 Boise State Public Radio