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Construction on I-84 in Caldwell breaks ground, should take multiple years to complete

Overhead of a highway on a clear sunny day with a blue freight ruck and a grey car driving towards the viewer.
Idaho Transportation Department
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Caldwell drivers can expect some delays on I-84 until 2027 as the Idaho Transportation Department starts a large-scale revamping of a heavily used segment of the Highway.

Caldwell drivers can expect some delays for the next couple of years as the Idaho Transportation Department starts a large-scale revamping of a heavily used segment of I-84.

ITD is starting construction on the two mile stretch of highway in Caldwell between Centennial Way and Franklin Road. Spokesperson Sophia Moraglio said the $93 million project is meant to accommodate the number of drivers.

“This project is designed to improve safety and mobility on this section of I-84, as traffic volumes are actually expected to double by 2045,” she added.

The plan is to widen the highway to three lanes in both directions, update the pedestrian overpass, replace the 10th avenue interchange and build a soundwall along Hannibal Street. Miraglio recommended drivers call 511 for updates on closures and traffic.

“Just make sure that you plan ahead and give yourself some extra time when traveling through this area,” she said. “It might be a pain now, but it's needed and it's going to feel so good once it's done.”

The speed limit will be reduced to 55 miles per hour during construction, which is expected to last until November 2027.

Graphic of the expected improvements once completed in 2027 with side pictures of four spots before construction begins.
Idaho Transportation Department
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The expected improvements on I-84 include widening the highway to three lanes in both directions, updating the pedestrian overpass, replacing the 10th avenue interchange and building a sound-wall along Hannibal Street.

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