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The Jan. 6 committee is holding hearings on its investigation of the Capitol riot

People gather in a park outside of the U.S. Capitol to watch the Jan. 6 House committee investigation hearing on Thursday night. The panel will next meet on Monday at 10 a.m.
Jose Luis Magana
/
AP
People gather in a park outside of the U.S. Capitol to watch the Jan. 6 House committee investigation hearing on Thursday night. The panel will next meet on Monday at 10 a.m.

Updated June 13, 2022 at 3:02 PM ET

The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection is holding a series of public hearings this month on what it has learned so far. The second hearing was Monday morning, and the next is Wednesday.

Monday's hearing focused on former President Trump's efforts to perpetuate the lie that widespread fraud had stolen the election from him even though he already knew he had lost. The committee says Trump's disinformation campaign directly led to the Jan. 6 riot.

Watch Wednesday's hearing live here:

"Ultimately, Donald Trump, the president of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down to the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Thompson said at the committee's first public hearing in prime time Thursday night.

Catch up on what happened during the first hearing here.

Republicans, meanwhile, have blasted the committee's work as illegitimate as Trump called the House committee investigation a "hoax" and continued to push his false narrative about election fraud.

In the panel's next hearing, Eric Herschmann will testify regarding his conversation with pro-Trump legal scholar John Eastman the day following the attack on Jan. 6. Herschmann was formerly Trump's impeachment lawyer.

"I said to him 'are you out of your f-ing mind? I only want to hear two words coming out of your mouth from now on: orderly transition," Herschmann said in a video clip presented during Monday's hearing.

Wednesday's hearing will focus on the former president's planning for Jan. 6 "including his plan to corrupt the Department of Justice and his detailed planning with lawyer John Eastman" to pressure officials to overturn the election, panel vice chair Republican Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming said Monday.

The panel is expected to release its findings in a report in September. It has interviewed more than 1,000 witnesses, publicly subpoenaed about 100 individuals, including members of Congress, and collected evidence like documents, texts and emails over nearly 11 months as part of its investigation into what happened the day of the Capitol insurrection and what led to it.

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