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Reporting from McCall – here are some of the stories you wanted told.

On The Tuesday, August 14, 2018 Edition Of Idaho Matters:

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  • Opponents to historical horse racing say the machines are the same as slots.
  • Boise writer J. Reuben Appelman investigates a Detroit serial killer.
  • Idaho Poet Diane Raptosh recieves Governor's Awards in the Arts.

- Idahoans will have the opportunity to vote for the restoration of historical horse racing machines this November when the measure appears on the ballot. These are gambling machines that allow the player to bet on the outcome of videos of random horse races. Opponents see these as an extension of slot machines, which were banned in Idaho in 2015. We'll look at objections held by those opposed to legalizing historical horse racing machines.

- Author J. Reuben Appelman's breadth of writing spans from true crime to UFC coverage to poetry. His latest book, The Kill Jar, chronicles the hunt for a serial killer who haunted his Detroit neighborhood in the 1970s. Appelman joins Idaho Matters to talk about crime writing and his fiction project based in Boise.

- Last week, the recipients of the 2018 Governor's Awards in the Arts were announced and they included former Boise Poet Laureate and Idaho writer-in-residence Diane Raptosh. Her works explore subjects including criminal justice, interpersonal relationships and the imagery of the American Northwest.  Raptosh currently teaches creative writing and criminal justice at the College of Idaho and she'll join Idaho Matters to talk about representing the Gem State with poetry.