Facebook

Over the past few decades there has been a revolution in terms of who controls consumer knowledge and information. This rapid change has imperiled the way we think. We shop with Amazon, socialize on Facebook, turn to Apple for entertainment, and rely on Google for information. 

But is there a hidden price we’re paying beyond that cheap shipping and low monthly subscription?


Boise State Public Radio


The coronavirus is reaching deeper into Idaho as the number of confirmed cases continue to rise. In the midst of all this, Facebook is becoming the meeting space for information and community support.

amazon

Ten years ago, Facebook was a godsend that helped connect families and friends and mitigate some of the loneliness and disconnect that has been plaguing post-war America. Today, critics claim Facebook is being used as a political and ideological weapon as well as a tool for hate speech, misogyny and harassment.

This encore interview originally aired in July, 2018.

Chances are that today, like every day, you’ll interact with one or more of four gigantic companies that have become embedded in daily life. Need to buy a book? It’s just a quick click away on Amazon. Curious about the person who wrote it? “Google” the author on your iPhone. You can follow her on Facebook, too. And that’s just the veritable tip of the iceberg when it comes to the services these companies provide. They can make our lives easier – but at what cost?

  

Image Source/Getty Images

This interview was originally broadcast Wednesday, June 27, 2018.

Social media may no longer be a new frontier for the experienced, but educating children about safe and responsible use is a changing dynamic. We look at ways for kids to stay (occasionally) plugged in while staying safe.

On The Wednesday, June 27, 2018 Edition Of Idaho Matters:

Jun 26, 2018

  • Kids and social media.
  • McCall's alcohol ban, one year later.
  • Key federal conservation fund scheduled to expire.
  • A look at the third installment of 'Our Changing Idaho.'

Idaho Legislature's Network Hacked

May 17, 2018
IDAHO LEGISLATURE WEBSITE

The Idaho Legislature's website was hacked two weeks ago by the Italian hacking group, AnonPlus. While no data had been stolen, just a publishing of their manifesto on the site, the hack exposed vulnerabilities in governmental websites. Boise State assistant computer science professor Hoda Mehrpouyan joins Idaho Matters to discuss cybersecurity in our public computer networks.

Idaho Student Journalists Tackle New News Media

May 8, 2018
JESSICA ROBERTS

News media has changed drastically since the beginning of the 2016 presidential election. Fake news, Russian bots, data mining and targeted news have changed the way front-line reporters get their content to consumers. 

Mark Zuckerberg is on the hot seat this week. He’s testifying in front of Congress about Facebook user profiles being mined without permission.  

The data breach prompted a “Delete Facebook” movement that hasn’t really gained any traction.

That’s especially true in the Native American community, where Facebook is much more than sharing cat videos or keeping in touch with friends and family.  

Jake Stephens for Idaho / Facebook

Idaho legislative candidate Jake Stephens says he was joking when he wrote on Facebook that he was out hunting Mexicans. The comment was posted underneath a picture of Stephens dressed in full camouflage and holding a rifle.

Stephens, a Republican, is running against first term Rep. Ryan Kerby, R-New Plymouth, in the upcoming May 17 primary election. Stephens says he was teasing a close friend, who is Mexican, while commenting on his own profile picture back in October.

Mass shootings in the U.S. in recent years have put access to firearms in the cross-hairs of gun control groups. Last year, some gun control advocates urged Facebook to ban posts advertising guns.

Facebook recently announced that it wouldn't do that, but that it would tighten its rules. Some gun control groups say Facebook missed the mark, but for gun owners, it's a good deal.

Cody Bourgeois recently got a new Smith and Wesson M&P .40 semi-automatic. He says it was his wife's idea.

KIDK via Facebook

The former Pocatello High School girls' basketball coach who was fired after a photograph appeared on a social networking website showing a male coach touching her chest is challenging her dismissal.

Last month, School District 25 officials fired Laraine Cook and are now seeking to have her teaching certificate revoked by the state Board of Education.