© 2024 Boise State Public Radio
NPR in Idaho
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations
KBSU 90.3 and KBSX 91.5 are operating at significantly reduced power at various times as workers for another broadcaster are on the tower. Power is reduced for their safety.

The school choice bill finally goes before Idaho lawmakers

This Friday, Dec. 11, 2009 shows the Idaho statehouse in Boise, Idaho. State lawmakers are finally scheduled to return to their official government home Monday, Jan. 11, 2010 in the Capitol building after 2 1/2 years and about $120 million in renovations and expansion work. (AP Photo/Charlie Litchfield)
Charlie Litchfield/ASSOCIATED PRESS
/
FR164915AP
This Friday, Dec. 11, 2009 shows the Idaho statehouse in Boise, Idaho. State lawmakers are finally scheduled to return to their official government home Monday, Jan. 11, 2010 in the Capitol building after 2 1/2 years and about $120 million in renovations and expansion work. (AP Photo/Charlie Litchfield)

We've been following House Bill 447, the School Choice bill, since it was introduced in January. It would allow public tax dollars to go toward supporting private school education. Lawmakers have tried over the past several years to pass a school choice bill – but none of those past proposals have become law.

Under the bill, families could get a refundable tax credit up to $5,000 to cover private education costs like school tuition or homeschool fees.

The powerful House Revenue and Taxation Committee held a two-hour hearing Tuesday and it’s the first time we’ve heard from lawmakers and the public on this bill.

After several people spoke, the head of the committee said they were running out of time and cut off testimony and then lawmakers took a vote. What did they decide?

Idaho Matters continues our deep dive into school choice.

Stay Connected
As Senior Producer of our live daily talk show Idaho Matters, I’m able to indulge my love of storytelling and share all kinds of information (I was probably a Town Crier in a past life). My career has allowed me to learn something new everyday and to share that knowledge with all my friends on the radio.

You make stories like this possible.

The biggest portion of Boise State Public Radio's funding comes from readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

Your donation today helps make our local reporting free for our entire community.