Social Media

CANYONLANDS NATIONAL PARK, UTAH — The dark blue, predawn sky was just beginning to brighten over Mesa Arch — a once-hidden gem in southern Utah — as Jonathan Zhang frantically set up his camera and tripod.

Almost every morning in January and February, Patrick Parsons records a live Facebook video across the street from the Georgia capitol.

While it looks picturesque online, in person, it’s not the world’s most glamorous moment.

“I’ll probably go over there by the trash can, which is where I usually do it,” said Parsons, laughing. It’s easier to fit the gold dome of the capitol building into the frame from there.

This encore interview originally aired in July, 2018.

Chances are that today, like every day, you’ll interact with one or more of four gigantic companies that have become embedded in daily life. Need to buy a book? It’s just a quick click away on Amazon. Curious about the person who wrote it? “Google” the author on your iPhone. You can follow her on Facebook, too. And that’s just the veritable tip of the iceberg when it comes to the services these companies provide. They can make our lives easier – but at what cost?

  

Image Source/Getty Images

This interview was originally broadcast Wednesday, June 27, 2018.

Social media may no longer be a new frontier for the experienced, but educating children about safe and responsible use is a changing dynamic. We look at ways for kids to stay (occasionally) plugged in while staying safe.

On The Monday, September 3, 2018 Edition Of Idaho Matters

Aug 31, 2018

Idaho Matters will return on Tuesday, September 4, with a live broadcast.  Please enjoy this encore presentation:

  • Idaho has one of the lowest rates of colon cancer screenings.

  • St. Luke's discusses kids and responsible social media use.

  • A Boise meet-up promotes positive body imaging.

  • A last chance to enjoy summer wines.

idahoatc.org

Social media can be used to inform, connect and entertain.  The Idaho Anti-Trafficking Coalition is using social media to bring awareness to Idahoans of the problem of human trafficking.  The coalition's director, Jennifer Zielinski, joins Idaho Matters to talk about the upcoming "social media blitz."

On The Wednesday, June 27, 2018 Edition Of Idaho Matters:

Jun 26, 2018

  • Kids and social media.
  • McCall's alcohol ban, one year later.
  • Key federal conservation fund scheduled to expire.
  • A look at the third installment of 'Our Changing Idaho.'

Idaho Student Journalists Tackle New News Media

May 8, 2018
JESSICA ROBERTS

News media has changed drastically since the beginning of the 2016 presidential election. Fake news, Russian bots, data mining and targeted news have changed the way front-line reporters get their content to consumers. 

Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

If you spend time scrolling the #idpol Twitter feed, you may have noticed the proliferation of parody accounts posting snarky – and often critical – jabs aimed at Idaho politicians.

via Twitter

Twitter has become ubiquitous in politics. The social media platform is one way to reach voters, but it’s not without pitfalls. In Idaho, there’s a growing number of Twitter accounts created just to make fun of Gem State politicos.


As anyone with children, or grandchildren, knows, parenting isn’t easy. Children and adolescents are growing up in a complex and connected world where smartphones, video games, organized activities and friends vie for their attention. At the same time, parents aren’t exactly always sure what their job description should be – or how to best nurture their child.

Domestic terrorism has taken many forms since the horrific events of September 11th. From these disparate acts, a sinister pattern of domestic terrorism has emerged as American Muslim men and women are radicalized from afar by extremist groups like ISIS.

Peter Bergen, is an internationally recognized expert on terrorism, a documentary producer and CNN’s national security analyst. In his latest book, titled United States of Jihad, Mr. Bergen discusses the social and political influences that can transform average Muslim Americans into homegrown terrorists.

Jake Stephens for Idaho / Facebook

Idaho legislative candidate Jake Stephens says he was joking when he wrote on Facebook that he was out hunting Mexicans. The comment was posted underneath a picture of Stephens dressed in full camouflage and holding a rifle.

Stephens, a Republican, is running against first term Rep. Ryan Kerby, R-New Plymouth, in the upcoming May 17 primary election. Stephens says he was teasing a close friend, who is Mexican, while commenting on his own profile picture back in October.

#WhyIStay: Show Us Why You Live In Idaho

May 9, 2014
Mount Borah
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

A recent Gallup survey found that 17 percent of Idahoans have made plans to leave the state within a year. Those planning to leave told Gallup it was primarily for work, family, and school-related reasons.

If given the option, 29 percent of Idahoans say they'd leave while 69 percent told Gallup they'd prefer to stay. So, we want to know why you've decided to live in Idaho.

Scott Ki / Boise State Public Radio

The lead up to the opening of a Nordstrom Rack in Boise last week turned into a mash-up of gift cards, cocktails, and social media. Twitter traffic was high and it raised questions over whether Nordstrom and tweeters followed Federal Trade Commission guidelines on endorsements.  There’s a lot of fuzziness when it comes to these guides.

Buzz is good in the public relations and marketing world.  High Twitter traffic and Facebook likes are to social media gurus what candy is to that clichéd baby.