Samantha Wright

News Reporter/Show Producer

Samantha Wright is a news reporter and producer for Idaho Matters.

Her spot reporting, special projects, and audio production have been featured on Voice of America, National Public Radio News, This American Life, National Native News, the Northwest Radio Network and on The New York Times website. Samantha earned a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award for Use of Sound for her feature “Co-op Cooks.”  She also earned a first place award for Use of Sound for her feature “Canning Makes a Comeback” from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Incorporated. Samantha was a co-producer of the Idaho StoryCorps Project. The project was recognized by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Cecil D. Andrus Papers / Special Collections and Archives, Boise State University

 


If you travel 30 miles south of Boise to Murphy, you'll find a unique home for the highest nesting density of birds of prey in North America. This is the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, which celebrated its 25th anniversary two years ago.  

reporter roundtable
ETHAN WEBBER / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

Another Friday...another Reporter Roundtable here on Idaho Matters! Listen to the discussion of the week's headlines from Madelyn Beck with the Mountain West News Bureau, KIVI 6 On Your Side's Mike Sharp and Erin Bamer of the Idaho Press. 

DARIN OSWALD / Idaho Statesman


Idaho’s oil and gas industry continues to spark interest, concern and controversy, especially in Payette County. Natural gas was discovered in southwest Idaho in 2010. Since then several gas wells and one oil well have been built. Now those wells are changing hands -- again. The new owner wants to put past issues of transparency and underpayments by the first owner behind him.

The Bosnian Herzegovinian Cultural Center of ldaho
VIA FACEBOOK / Mladi Behar The Bosnian Herzegovinian Cultural Center of ldaho


The Bosnian-Herzegovinian Cultural Center of Idaho has been in Boise since 2000, when thousands of refugees came to the United States fleeing war and conflict. Some settled in the Treasure Valley. Since then, community members have been using traditional dance, music and food to share Bosnian culture with Idaho.

Alexandra Wyman / AP Images


The fashion industry is about more than just clothes. It’s also about scandal, #MeToo moments, human trafficking and murder.

At least that’s what the new book “Fashion Jungle” is about. Co-author Rachel van Dyken is from Boise, and joins Idaho Matters to talk about her book, which is based on real events from her co-author and former supermodel Kathy Ireland’s life and career. 

In this seasonal, weekly podcast, we break down the Idaho Legislature so you don't have to. We dig into what's happening, drill down into the why and find out how it affects you.

The Legislature makes the laws, controls the money and creates the rules that govern life in Idaho. Each Friday, we ask these questions: What just happened? How does it affect your life?

It’s Friday and time for our Reporter Roundtable where we get you up to date on all the news that made headlines around our state this week from housing to trash wars to trash juice. These are just some of the topics we’ll be discussing.

Plus, some political foes are coming together as allies to talk and teach about the importance of civil discourse in our country. We’ll look at how Idaho Democrats and Republicans are coming together to discuss this issue.

Idaho Matters is the place on-air and online where folks with different views can talk with each other, exchange ideas, debate with respect and come away richer from the experience. 

election, voting, vote, ballot
James Dawson / Boise State Public Radio

It was an historic election night in the capital city as the race for Boise mayor will now go to a run off. Plus, numerous initiatives and levies were on the ballot throughout Idaho and we dive into those results. We bring you a full hour of election results and analysis on Idaho Matters.


reporter roundtable
ETHAN WEBBER / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

Legislative session is in full swing here in Idaho. Our own Jimmy Dawson, Kevin Richert (Idaho Ed News) and Don Day (BoiseDev) explain what's gone down this week in the capitol and beyond. 

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Jordan Allred is a Boise tattoo artist who is known for her black and grey floral designs. Not long ago, she was contacted by producers of the hit TV reality show “Ink Master: Turf War” where top tattoo artists from around the country compete for a $100,000 prize.

She’s back in town after filming the 13th season of the show which premieres Jan. 7. Samantha Wright dropped by the “Born Weird Tattoo” shop to watch her work on one of her clients.

Audrey Magoun USFWS FPWC

Several conservation groups filed notice Thursday that they intend to sue the Trump administration over protections for wolverines.

Georgia Innocence Project

 

In 1993, a Georgia man named Kerry Robinson was accused of raping a woman at gunpoint. He served 18 years in prison – but he was innocent.

Greg Hampikian is a biology professor at Boise State University and has spent a decade working to free Robinson through the Georgia Innocence Project. Hampikian calls this "the biggest work of his career." 

"This has been a big battle," he said in an interview on Idaho Matters. 

Just last week, Hampikian received a call saying Robison would be released from prison after the DNA evidence that put him in prison was proven to be faulty. He joined Idaho Matters to talk about what it took to prove Robinsons innocence after almost 20 years behind bars, and the challenges of relying on certain kinds of DNA testing in criminal cases. 

Milo Burcham


  Twenty-five years ago, wolves were reintroduced in Idaho. Ranchers feared for their livestock while wolf supporters celebrated their return. The controversial decision still is playing out today. We talk with Suzanne Stone of the Wood River Wolf Project and former Idaho Statesman environmental reporter Rocky Barker about this historic anniversary.

reporter roundtable
ETHAN WEBBER / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

It's been a busy first week after the holidays. To break it all down, tune in to the Reporter Roundtable as reporters Heath Druzin of Boise State Public Radio, Betsy Russell of the Idaho Press and Nicole Foy of the Idaho Statesman join us.

Seth Wenig / AP Photos

In 2019, 26,000 Idahoans 65 and older were living with Alzheimer’s disease. Now, new research suggests that drugs being tested to stop that disease are not working. Some scientists say 30 years of past research on what causes the illness may be all wrong. Some of that research is coming out of Boise State University.

 


Michael Dwyer / AP Images


When you think of Alzheimer's, you think of plaque. For 30 years, clumps of these proteins have been suspected of causing the memory loss that comes with Alzheimer’s. But at least three new studies say those plaques might not be the driving force behind the disease. That could affect how we diagnose and treat it. Dr. Troy Rohn of Boise State University joins Idaho Matters to talk about this new theory. 

IDeal

 

The cost of college education keeps going up. Idaho tries to mitigate that cost with a state-sponsored 529 college savings program. It’s called IDeal and it has shifted over time to better help future students and their families save for higher education. IDeal’s executive director Christie Stoll joins Idaho Matters shares details on a new national campaign to help families start saving sooner.

ETHAN WEBBER / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

From Medicaid to Boise Mayor Dave Bieter's exit, the Reporter Roundtable brings you the biggest headlines of the week — and what to expect heading into the legislative session. For this first Roundtable of 2020, we're joined by reporters James Dawson of Boise State Public Radio, Margaret Carmel with the Idaho Press and Scott McIntosh of the Idaho Statesman.

Ryan Wick / Flickr Creative Commons

Telling the story of our universe is one of the main roles of astronomers. Idaho Matters talks with astronomer J.A. Grier of the Planetary Science Institute, who specializes in impact craters. Besides telling the story of the cosmos, the scientist writes science fiction and poetry in her spare time. You can catch her free lecture Friday at 7:30 p.m. at Boise State University. 

VIA FACEBOOK

 

This interview orginally aired Dec. 18, 2019.   

Idaho Parents Unlimited provides many services to folks with disabilities. One of their programs, called "Work of Art" allows corporations to decorate their offices with art from people in the program. Idaho Matters talks with program coordinators about this unique oppportunity. 

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Jordan Allred is a Boise tattoo artist who is known for her black and grey floral designs. Not long ago, she was contacted by producers of the hit TV reality show “Ink Master: Turf War” where top tattoo artists from around the country compete for a $100,000 prize.

She’s back in town after filming the 13th season of the show which premieres Jan. 7. Before she joined Idaho Matters in studio, we dropped by the “Born Weird Tattoo” shop to watch her work on one of her clients.

Hannah Gordoski / Boise State Public Radio

As we reflect on 2019, we're looking back at some of our best interviews, through challenging conversations and illuminating storytelling. This segment originally aired September 17, 2019.

Thanks for being a part of Idaho Matters this year! Have a question or story idea for 2020? Email us: idahomatters@boisestate.edu

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Idaho Parents Unlimited provides many services to folks with disabilities. One of their programs, called "Work of Art" allows corporations to decorate their offices with art from people in the program. Idaho Matters talks with program coordinators about this unique oppportunity. 

Idaho Ed News

The Idaho State Board of Education has targeted literacy proficiency as a metric that needs to improve throughout the Gem State. However, their efforts have failed to reach the targeted goals, with under half of all kindergarten and first graders and under two thirds of second and third graders reaching proficient levels. Kevin Richert of Idaho EdNews joins Idaho Matters to discuss his latest article.

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